Drug Addiction News

Schools supply college students recovering from drug and alcohol issues assist and a spot to assemble – Inside Increased Ed

James Cafran's early experiences with college were rocky.

He attended Marist College, a private institution in New York, and dropped out of college at the beginning of his junior year. A year and a half later, he tried again and moved to Stony Brook University, which is part of the State University of New York system. He left just two weeks after enrolling.

"I thought it would be a fresh start, but the change in the environment didn't work," he said.

Until then, drugs and alcohol had taken over Cafran's life. Two days after he left Stony Brook, he attended a 30-day drug and alcohol rehabilitation program, and then moved to a facility that was specifically designed for young adults like him who had to deal with addiction.

A year later he returned to college, this time at Sacred Heart University, a Roman Catholic university in Fairfield, Connecticut. There he found his place – and his calling.

Three sober years later, Cafran is now the coordinator of the university's newly launched Collegiate Recovery Program (CRP), one of 136 such programs at colleges and universities across the country on drug or alcohol problems.

While public health officials and policymakers have focused on containing the country's deadly opioid epidemic, higher institutions have focused attention on combating student alcoholism and drug addiction. University leaders and student administrators are increasingly engaging with recovery programs and centers on campus to meet students' social and emotional needs and overcome obstacles that prevent them from completing their degrees.

Texas Tech University has a large, well-established recovery program that is considered a national model. It has dozens of paid employees and well over 100 students participate in the program. Rutgers University has a program that has been running for 30 years. Kennesaw State University in Georgia and Augsburg University in Minneapolis also offer long-term recovery programs.

The programs make a difference

There is a growing consensus among mental health and addiction experts that these programs are needed.

"Universities are very heterogeneous in terms of the availability of substances on campus and the strictness of guidelines regarding alcohol and other drug use," said a report by the Center for Health and Development of Young Adults at the University of Maryland School of Public Health. "However, the college's social environment can present major challenges to students, especially in situations where alcohol and drug use determine the social environment. These challenges are addressed by adapting to new academic requirements, independence from parental supervision and the financial pressure intensified. " can also trigger a relapse. "

Both the US Department of Education and the Office of National Drug Control Policy have historically advocated expanding support services for recovery in academic settings, saying they should be a priority.

College recovery programs offer recovery students the opportunity to take advantage of addiction counseling, join self-help groups and 12-step recovery programs, seek quick help when they break their sobriety, or just chat in a supportive alcohol – and drug-free environment among peers. Some programs, such as Sacred Heart, even offer weekly meditation or yoga classes.

The program at Scared Heart is modest – Cafran is the only paid employee – but university administrators hope to eventually offer the program students a special home on campus and outside, as well as colleges and universities with an established recovery Programs yes.

Cafran described the new recovery center rather as a "post-crisis treatment center". He said that although the university is currently hiring an addiction counselor to be based in the student health center, professional addiction treatment services will be provided by an external service provider.

The recreation center, which is located in a renovated lounge in the main academic building on campus, was opened at the beginning of the academic year. College officials, however, began promoting it in the summer and recruiting students interested in the program and enrolling at the university.

So far there are only six students in the program who have identified themselves as alcoholic or marijuana addicted or in recovery, although this number could increase given the record rate of marijuana use among college students. Other students who have no drug or alcohol problems and are not recovering from addictions but support the goals of the program also take an active part.

"The goal is to reach the entire school and destigmatize addiction," said 24-year-old Cafran, who graduated from Sacred Heart University in December 2018 with a bachelor's degree in corporate marketing. "We want to reach as many people as possible, including those in favor of recovery," and let students know "that they can be sober and live a life free of drugs and alcohol."

 Picture by James Cafran and Bill Mitchell "class =" caption "src =" http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/media/picture.jpeg "style =" width: 400px ; Height: 263px; Swimmer: left; margin: 10px; "title =" James Cafran and Bill Mitchell "/> He said a local center could help normalize college addiction recovery," so one student says: & # 39; I am recovering and I am in the school is not considered to have three members. "</p>
<p> More importantly, the center provides student support services that they would normally have to pick up from campus, which, according to the Center for Health and Development of Young Adults report, is not ideal. </p>
<p> "Such external services alone may not be sufficient to support their recovery because they are not tailored to the particular challenges that college students face," the report said. "In the face of such challenges, many young people in recovery choose recovery and go to school. For them, dropping out of college feels safer and more attractive than exposing themselves to an environment that is contrary to them." Indeed, for these students, a pro-drinking-pro-drug college scene becomes an obstacle to college enrollment and graduation. "</p>
<p> <strong> From opponent to fan </strong> </p>
<p> Larry Wielk, the Dean of Sacred Heart students, initially opposed the idea of ​​a recovery center. </p>
<p> "I was quite vocal about my reluctance to start a rest home," he said. "It's not that I didn't support having one on campus, but that I felt we weren't ready as campus." </p>
<p> He was also concerned about the results of the students. </p>
<p> "I felt that if we did not use the support systems, we could not help them and might set them up for failure," he said.</p>
<p> Students participating in campus restoration programs actually have better academic outcomes, according to the University of Maryland School of Public Health research center. </p>
<p> There are indications that CRPs "both contribute to better academic results (e.g. graduation rates, GPA) and to a successful recovery," the report said. "Members viewed CRP services as helpful, stating that recovery support services are fundamental to their ability to stay in school, be academically successful, and maintain well-being, especially for students who are in one earlier stage of recovery. " </p>
<p> The report found that the benefits of participating in the programs apparently persisted after graduation and also affected classmates who were not involved in the programs. </p>
<p> Some experts believe that the benefits of a CRP extend beyond its membership to the entire student body. A strong campus-based infrastructure of recovery support services could motivate some students to abstain and recover if they are already thinking about it. Students in recovery are likely to have a positive impact on reducing their peers' substance use as their personal experiences provide authentic & # 39; warning stories & # 39; that "can dispel the attraction of abusive drinking". "</p>
<p> For this reason, more colleges should think about starting programs, said Tim Rabolt, executive director of the Association of Recovery in Higher Education, a network of colleges and universities that share the mission to help students recover. The association represents collegial recovery programs and provides institutions with information, resources, connections and technical support to "change the development of the recovery of student life". </p>
<p> "We hope there will be some form of program on each campus," Rabolt said, adding that the organization receives regular requests from universities across the country interested in starting recovery programs. </p>
<p> The 136 existing programs have increased about tenfold in the past seven years; According to the association, there were around a dozen programs on the college campus in 2012. </p>
<p> Rabolt said the opioid epidemic has helped raise awareness and support for college recovery centers. </p>
<p> "Even though opioid use was not as widespread on the college campus, it was one of the main arguments in the media, so it definitely contributed to detection," he said, referring to the numerous opioid-related events and town halls during the The epidemic peak was held on the college campus from 2014 to 2016. </p>
<p> Wielk recognized that the problem required such attention, but was still concerned about whether the right time to start a recovery program through Scared Heart had come. He was convinced by Bill Mitchell, a long-time member of the university's board of trustees, whose idea it was to start the program. </p>
<p> "Bill didn't necessarily disagree, but he's in a hurry," said Wielk. "He'd talked about a rest home for about a year and talked to people in our advancement office about raising money for it." </p>
<p> Mitchell, a self-described alcoholic who has been sober for 29 years, has also campaigned for the President of Sacred Heart, John J. Petillo. </p>
<p> "I was rehearsing a speech," Mitchell recalled meeting Petillo. "Four words, he said, & # 39; I am in. & # 39;" </p>
<p> Next, he had to persuade the board of trustees to buy. </p>
<p> "I agreed that we would not invest in the foundation or operational funds and that the program would be self-sustaining," he said. </p>
<p> Mitchell offered to raise funds for the recovery program and helped recruit donors to the university's annual donation gala in June 2018. The event is typically used to fund scholarships, but last year was dedicated to supporting the recovery program. A record $ 1.3 million was raised, a significant portion of which went to Mitchell, who was officially honored at the gala for his many years of service and support at the university. A second fundraising gala in September, separate from the annual fundraiser for fundraisers, raised $ 203,000 more. </p>
<p> With the funding, the university administrators have approached the Caron Treatment Centers, which operate facilities across the country to help develop a strategic plan. </p>
<p> The plan included interviewing students and faculty and performing a needs assessment to determine "what we had on campus to support this type of program and what we had to do," said Wielk. He said 30 to 35 individual meetings were held with students and student directors, student affairs and admissions staff, faculty members, and trustees to receive their contributions. </p>
<p> When the decision was made to continue, Sacred Heart sent mass emails to local high schools, treatment centers and various organizations in the area to inform them of the opening of the center – and recovered from students attending the University were interested. </p>
<p> "I can't even tell you how many emails I received in response to the announcement that started this program," said Wielk. People told him stories about their drug and alcohol addiction or that of their relatives or friends. "It has certainly resonated with many people, whether it concerns them or someone they know or love," he said. "It's great to be able to help students get back on their feet and help them become what they want." </p>
<p> Such enthusiastic support for campus recovery programs has not always been the norm in science, and despite the recent growth of CRP on college campuses, support from the Association of Recovery in Higher Education is not universal. </p>
<p> Students with drug or alcohol problems are more likely to be ignored or overlooked on campus, where the focus of the study support programs is "on maintaining and mitigating the damage caused by the university experience" and not on "creating a place within higher education" for them marginalized population ”, says the association's website. </p>
<p> "While other groups of classically marginalized populations are gaining ground and support within the university environment (e.g. LGBTQ, gender equality, ethnic identities), those in recovery have largely been left in the dark due to the fact that their needs run counter to the prevailing narrative of the university world. "</p>
<p> This narrative is clearly rewritten by people like Cafran and Mitchell, who understand on a deeply personal level what it is like to be a beneficiary of a recovery program and to help launch and run one. </p>
<p> "We bury children in our country every month for drug overdose," Mitchell said. "We will not save the world, but we will save lives one by one and end the stigma." </p>
<p> Cafran believes that his own story of addiction and recovery can be instructive for students who come to the center for help, although "it is not always the most convenient for me to share things in my past happened ". This includes the abuse of alcohol, cocaine, marijuana, xanax and other substances, as well as hospitalization for extreme poisoning, which he once attributed to circumstances rather than addiction. </p>
<p> "I got mixed up with drugs and alcohol very quickly," he said. "I was hanging out with the wrong people. I never looked at myself and admitted that I had a problem." </p>
<p> It was not easy to switch from a drug addict to a sober graduate, but Cafran maintained the course of recovery despite the obstacles he created in his own way as he jumped from one college to another. </p>
<p> Marist: "I got into trouble and was sent to the dean's office," he said of his time there. "I was put on probation and threatened to be kicked out." </p>
<p> Stony Brook: "I passed out almost every night," he said. "I drank all sorts of drugs and alcohol. I couldn't go anywhere. I called my parents and said, "I'm ready to get help." I was in rehab two days later. "</p>
<p> Sacred Heart: "I never thought my past would be a good thing on my resume, but it turned out to be a good thing." </p>
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		<script type={"@context":"http:\/\/schema.org","@type":"Article","dateCreated":"2020-01-05T09:38:14+00:00","datePublished":"2020-01-05T09:38:14+00:00","dateModified":"2020-01-05T09:38:15+00:00","headline":"Schools supply college students recovering from drug and alcohol issues assist and a spot to assemble – Inside Increased Ed","name":"Schools supply college students recovering from drug and alcohol issues assist and a spot to assemble – Inside Increased Ed","keywords":[],"url":"https:\/\/drugrehabcentershelpline.com\/2020\/01\/05\/schools-supply-college-students-recovering-from-drug-and-alcohol-issues-assist-and-a-spot-to-assemble-inside-increased-ed\/","description":"James Cafran's early experiences with college were rocky. He attended Marist College, a private institution in New York, and dropped out of college at the beginning of his junior year. A year and","copyrightYear":"2020","articleSection":"Drug Addiction News","articleBody":" James Cafran's early experiences with college were rocky. \n He attended Marist College, a private institution in New York, and dropped out of college at the beginning of his junior year. A year and a half later, he tried again and moved to Stony Brook University, which is part of the State University of New York system. He left just two weeks after enrolling. \n "I thought it would be a fresh start, but the change in the environment didn't work," he said. \n Until then, drugs and alcohol had taken over Cafran's life. Two days after he left Stony Brook, he attended a 30-day drug and alcohol rehabilitation program, and then moved to a facility that was specifically designed for young adults like him who had to deal with addiction. \n A year later he returned to college, this time at Sacred Heart University, a Roman Catholic university in Fairfield, Connecticut. There he found his place - and his calling. \n Three sober years later, Cafran is now the coordinator of the university's newly launched Collegiate Recovery Program (CRP), one of 136 such programs at colleges and universities across the country on drug or alcohol problems. \n While public health officials and policymakers have focused on containing the country's deadly opioid epidemic, higher institutions have focused attention on combating student alcoholism and drug addiction. University leaders and student administrators are increasingly engaging with recovery programs and centers on campus to meet students' social and emotional needs and overcome obstacles that prevent them from completing their degrees. \n Texas Tech University has a large, well-established recovery program that is considered a national model. It has dozens of paid employees and well over 100 students participate in the program. Rutgers University has a program that has been running for 30 years. Kennesaw State University in Georgia and Augsburg University in Minneapolis also offer long-term recovery programs. \n The programs make a difference \n There is a growing consensus among mental health and addiction experts that these programs are needed. \n "Universities are very heterogeneous in terms of the availability of substances on campus and the strictness of guidelines regarding alcohol and other drug use," said a report by the Center for Health and Development of Young Adults at the University of Maryland School of Public Health. "However, the college's social environment can present major challenges to students, especially in situations where alcohol and drug use determine the social environment. These challenges are addressed by adapting to new academic requirements, independence from parental supervision and the financial pressure intensified. " can also trigger a relapse. "\n Both the US Department of Education and the Office of National Drug Control Policy have historically advocated expanding support services for recovery in academic settings, saying they should be a priority. \n College recovery programs offer recovery students the opportunity to take advantage of addiction counseling, join self-help groups and 12-step recovery programs, seek quick help when they break their sobriety, or just chat in a supportive alcohol - and drug-free environment among peers. Some programs, such as Sacred Heart, even offer weekly meditation or yoga classes. \n The program at Scared Heart is modest - Cafran is the only paid employee - but university administrators hope to eventually offer the program students a special home on campus and outside, as well as colleges and universities with an established recovery Programs yes. \n Cafran described the new recovery center rather as a "post-crisis treatment center". He said that although the university is currently hiring an addiction counselor to be based in the student health center, professional addiction treatment services will be provided by an external service provider. \n The recreation center, which is located in a renovated lounge in the main academic building on campus, was opened at the beginning of the academic year. College officials, however, began promoting it in the summer and recruiting students interested in the program and enrolling at the university. \n So far there are only six students in the program who have identified themselves as alcoholic or marijuana addicted or in recovery, although this number could increase given the record rate of marijuana use among college students. Other students who have no drug or alcohol problems and are not recovering from addictions but support the goals of the program also take an active part. \n "The goal is to reach the entire school and destigmatize addiction," said 24-year-old Cafran, who graduated from Sacred Heart University in December 2018 with a bachelor's degree in corporate marketing. 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